Chinese (Traditional)FrenchGermanItalianJapanesePortugueseRussianSpanishSerbian

Share

Severed Sponsor

The Latest

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

Severed Cinema Review: Underground Gore Dealers Connection: Gore Shorts Film Anthology from D.I.Y. Productions
 

Severed Cinema DVD review of Ray Davies Return to Waterloo
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

Severed Sponsor





Rubber Print E-mail
User Rating: / 5
PoorBest 
Written by Ray Casta   
Wednesday, 02 March 2011

Rubber Poster Image on Severed Cinema

Directed by: Quentin Dupieux
Written by: Quentin Dupieux
Produced by: Julien Berlan , Gregory Bernard
Cinematography by: Quentin Dupieux
Music by: Gaspard Augé, Quentin Dupieux
Cast: Thomas F. Duffy, Cecelia Antoinette, Gaspard Augé, David Bowe
Year: 2010
Country: USA
Language: English
Color: Color
Runtime: 1 h 25 min

Official Website: Rubber
Official Website: Rubber

A movie with an inanimate object as its main character?  What!?

Oh, where to start?  I could start by saying I have never seen a movie quite like "Rubber" in my life.  I can attempt to explain what the movie is about.  It's about a tire (we learn its name is Robert) lurking around a quiet desert town.  The tire rolls along the deserted roads, as it runs over discarded bottles and eventually causes major destruction by blowing people's heads up in great Cronenbergian fashion.  Yes, that's what the movie is about.  With a batshit crazy premise like that, how can you not want to see the movie?  Sounds dumb, huh?  I sure as hell couldn't pass it up, and if this wildly preposterous idea grabs your attention, I'm sure you will have a very similar reaction as I did, during and after watching the movie: "What the fuck!?"

The film, directed by Quentin Dupieux, opens in the Californian desert.  In the opening frames, a well-dressed man with glasses, known simply as the Accountant (Jack Plotnick) appears to be standing lone on a roadway.  A car drives up, manoeuvring through a little maze of chairs.  The trunk opens, and out comes Sheriff Xaiver (Stephen Spinella).  This sequence is where the movie lays its groundwork and "rules."  Its general philosophy is delivered, answering exactly "why" the movie was made in the first place: "No reason," as Sheriff Xaiver explains, in an inspired monologue.  Speaking into the camera, he addresses the viewer.  He mentions a few well-known Hollywood movies, and explains that there's no reason for many of the things that make them popular.  The camera reveals there is a group of bystanders watching from afar -- representing "us", indefinitely.  Director Dupieux doesn't just break the fourth wall, he flat-out says, "Fuck it to hell."

Robert, the murderous tire with telekinetic powers, is seemingly targeting a young woman, while Sheriff Xaiver must find a way to stop it.  There is a movie within a movie element that reveals a clever, absurdist commentary on the state of Hollywood and movie watching in general.  We'll examine a movie as critics, we'll be excited by popcorn entertainment, and as horror fans, we'll gawk at bloodshed on screen as if it's a tragic accident we can't take our eyes off of.  This is what the characters, who represent the "viewers watching at home," do.  The prevalent theme of suspending your disbelief is projected by the inclusion of the bystanders who watch the tire roam the desert and kill through binoculars.  As an interesting and cool twist to all this, Sheriff Xaiver hires the Accountant to drive away the bystanders.  Why?  Well, if no one is watching, there is no movie to speak of.

"Rubber" was made for the same reason we learn in the opening monologue: No reason.  The movie was made because it can be made, and the director has a grand old time poking fun at his audience with his self-aware meta language.  As alluded to in the monologue, the movie is a pure homage to "style."  This is a magnificent feat, both visually and technically.  The detail of these the images are plentiful.  The landscape is beautiful.  This is, of course, all thanks to an intensely keen cinematic eye of Dupieux.  He serves as cinematography along with writer-director, and his soundtrack choice is just exceptional.  He does not succumb to convention, nor does he aim to make another "Christine" or "Duel."  A pitch-black, hilarious take on cinema and a punch-drunk haymaker to Hollywood, "Rubber" wants to piss some viewers off, perplex others and satisfy those who choose to sit back and enjoy its outlandishness.

In the 80 minutes of its run time, we watch the tire, Richard telepathically will people's heads to explode over and over again to the point where we grow weary.  These tedious, repetitive moments bog down the otherwise inventive concept that would have been much better served as a short film.  At feature length, there are dull, muted stretches where the tire rolls around searching for his next victim with zero suspense.  This is all well and good, if there was more of a horror/slasher element that works well enough.  The "exploding heads" are wonderful to behold and all, but the "splatter" stuff is not as fun as I originally hoped.  But it's the experimental "randomness" that is what makes the movie worth watching.  I firmly hesitate to call the movie "brilliant."  This is something I will never watch again and its episodic obviousness is where most viewers will ultimately draw a line in the sand.  I felt the fourth wall commentary was fascinating and unique, without completely overstaying its welcome.  It's a tough film to recommend and an even tougher film to watch with a straight face.  If David Lynch would ever direct "Wall-E" as a live-action film then it would probably be something like Quentin Dupieux's "Rubber!"

Rubber Poster Image on Severed Cinema Rubber Poster Image on Severed Cinema

Rubber Poster Image on Severed Cinema

 


CLICK TO ENLARGE IMAGE
Rubber Screenshot Image on Severed Cinema

Rubber Screenshot Image on Severed Cinema

Rubber Screenshot Image on Severed Cinema

Rubber Screenshot Image on Severed Cinema

Rubber Screenshot Image on Severed Cinema

Rubber Screenshot Image on Severed Cinema

Rubber Screenshot Image on Severed Cinema

Rubber Screenshot Image on Severed Cinema

Rubber Screenshot Image on Severed Cinema

Rubber Screenshot Image on Severed Cinema

Rubber Screenshot Image on Severed Cinema

Rubber Screenshot Image on Severed Cinema

Rubber Screenshot Image on Severed Cinema

Rubber Screenshot Image on Severed Cinema

Rubber Screenshot Image on Severed Cinema

Rubber Screenshot Image on Severed Cinema

 RATING:
 MOVIE: 1 Skull - Severed Cinema1 Skull - Severed Cinema1 Skull - Severed Cinema0 Skull - Severed Cinema0 Skull - Severed Cinema

 

Comments
Add New Search
David L Tamarin  - Severed Cinema     |98.217.240.xxx |2011-03-03 05:56:00
I cannot wait to see this! What an amazing idea. The best part of the preview
was seeing a police car with its sirens on pull over the tire.
Write comment
Name:
Email:
 
Website:
Title:
UBBCode:
[b] [i] [u] [url] [quote] [code] [img] 
 
 
Please input the anti-spam code that you can read in the image.

3.22 Copyright (C) 2007 Alain Georgette / Copyright (C) 2006 Frantisek Hliva. All rights reserved."

Last Updated ( Wednesday, 02 March 2011 )
 
< Prev   Next >
© 2005-2016 Severed Cinema  |  Web Design by: Chris Mayo

Bookmark and Share