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Suckling, The Print E-mail
User Rating: / 9
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Written by Chris Mayo   
Sunday, 20 January 2008

THE SUCKLING Cover - SEVERED-CINEMA.COM

AKA: SEWAGE BABY
Directed by: Francis Teri
Produced by: Michael Helman
Cinematography by: Harry Eisenstein
Cast: Michael Gingold, Marie Michaels, Lisa Petruno, Gerald Preger, Frank Rivera, Janet Sovey
Year: 1990
Country: USA
Color: Color
Runtime: 90 Minutes
 

http://severed-cinema.com/images/horizon.jpg

“He’ll Always Be Mommy’s Little Mutant”

Characters in Horror films are often stereotyped. In a given situation, the characters are expected to act illogically. A heroine will run from an axe-wielding murderer, upstairs rather than out the front door, etcetera. This sad but sometimes true rule of thumb can often be forgiven for a variety of reasons: sex, gore, violence, nudity. The Suckling is no exception of the stereotype, that characters will make dim-witted decisions. In fact this film crushes all hope of dismissing this rule with what is probably the largest compilation of moronic characters ever committed to celluloid. That said, can the viewer be forgiving of characters idiocy, due to the possible abundance of Sewage Baby bloodshed?

A young man inadvertently gets his lady friend pregnant. Being the persuasive gent that he is, the young man convinces his girlfriend that it would be in her best interest to skip the hospital visit, and instead check out Big Mamma’s House of Whores. In addition to being a whorehouse, it is also conveniently a fetal evacuation clinic. The young lass is drugged and tugged (coat hanger style), and before we know it, the fetus is flushed into the New York City sewer system.

Once the girl awakens, the realization sets in that her unborn child has been skewered out of her like an embryonic kebab, and flushed down the drain. Little does she know her little blossom is still alive and convulsing in a puddle of toxic sludge. This convulsing critter has hastily mutated into a shape-shifting monster menace, with a vengeance.

Changing his physique, our Sewage Baby caters to the script and returns up the drain from whence he was flushed. Wasting no time, revenge commences when our little mutant whips out his whore-mangling umbilical cord, and decapitates a wayward whore. Thus begins the carnage that follows.

Apparently not only can this monster change his shape to cater to the script, but he can also create a cocoon (pathetically compiled of fabric and potato sacks) that surrounds the house, preventing the folks inside from escaping. Ordinarily one would be able to escape from behind a locked wooden door, but this isn’t the case in The Suckling. Apparently this uncanny creature can make the average wooden door impenetrable. Each of the whorehouse’s inhabitants, are incapable of escaping, no matter how hard they try. When they try to kick the door down -- WWE style make-believe door kicks and all -- it is to zero avail. Another pathetic individual looked like he was in agony trying to hammer a screwdriver through the door, using it as a chisel. With each child-powered tap, it was of no use. They even argue who should use the hammer and screwdriver. At this point I screamed at the screen to kick the fucking door in. I could handle these helpless fucks running up the stairs to their demise (which they do), or venturing blindly into the fabric tunnel of afterbirth (which they do), but not tearing that fucking door off the hinges in a fit of desperation (or rage as I felt) is unforgivable!

Sewage Baby, or the more apt title, The Suckling, is a one of a kind Flush Revenge film, and is in a sub-genre of its own. While the film is grimy and sleazy -- which you can’t deny, as the fetus rolls down the sewer with its umbilical cord tangling the whole way -- The Suckling is also retribution for all the voiceless fetal kebabs of similar demise that haven’t had their day, until now.

Aside from the indefensible actions of these halfwit cast (which I wanted all to die), The Suckling is entertaining and does deliver some decent gore, un-PC situations, and a pretty damn cool creature design, that should have spent more time on film. The finale was satisfying, in an otherwise mixed bag of a film. This review is from an older print, but the Elite release is approaching, for all interested parties. If you can handle the imbecility of the characters, and you enjoy cool traditional creature makeup, then you should check this out at a reasonable price.

THE SUCKLING Screen Shot 01 - SEVERED-CINEMA.COM

 THE SUCKLING Screen Shot 02 - SEVERED-CINEMA.COM

 THE SUCKLING Screen Shot 03 - SEVERED-CINEMA.COM

 THE SUCKLING Screen Shot 04 - SEVERED-CINEMA.COM

 THE SUCKLING Screen Shot 05 - SEVERED-CINEMA.COM

 THE SUCKLING Screen Shot 06 - SEVERED-CINEMA.COM

 THE SUCKLING Screen Shot 07 - SEVERED-CINEMA.COM

 THE SUCKLING Screen Shot 08 - SEVERED-CINEMA.COM

 THE SUCKLING Screen Shot 09 - SEVERED-CINEMA.COM

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3.22 Copyright (C) 2007 Alain Georgette / Copyright (C) 2006 Frantisek Hliva. All rights reserved."

Last Updated ( Monday, 10 March 2008 )
 
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